How to future-proof homes and minimise construction time

How to future-proof homes and minimise construction time



Quadrant Building Control has inspected a range of properties which were built to be “future-proof” thanks to their thermal insulation….

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Quadrant Building Control has inspected a range of properties which were built to be “future-proof” thanks to their thermal insulation…

The building control service which works with homeowners, architects, contractors and developers assessed the eco-credentials in the development of five Trivselhus houses in Meopham, Kent.

The two and four bedroom detached houses were built by small-scale niche house builder Cedar Rydal, in partnership with Swedish building company Trivselhus.

The inspection unveiled that the triple glazed Trivselhus doors and windows, as well as the service conduits for electricity and plumbing, are pre-fitted into the wall panel at factory stage in order to limit construction time.

“These features are aimed at minimising construction time while ensuring that the occupants don’t experience draughts and energy loss,” commented Paul Knight, Director at Quadrant Building Control.


Paul Knight, Director at Quadrant Building Control

“The whole house has mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for good air quality and no wasted warmth. 

“The thermal standards that these houses have been built to exceed the current standards required by the building regulations and the recommended standards for zero-carbon homes that the Government committed to introducing in future changes to the building regulations.”

Heating and hot water in these homes come from a high-efficiency gas condensing boiler, resulting in them being very thermally efficient. 

“There is 240mm of mineral wool insulation built into the closed panels of the house at factory stage, which provides a highly insulated layer,” added Joe Campion, Director at Quadrant Building Control.


Joe Campion, Director at Quadrant Building Control

“It is very difficult to put more thermal insulation into the fabric of a standard house,” he added, stating: “Future-proofing means maximising the building’s thermal insulation so that future improvements such as installing photovoltaic (PV) solar panels for additional energy and a solar thermal system for significantly reducing water heating bills become easy.”

“Solar thermal and PV solar panels can be fitted post-completion as Government subsidies, Feed in Tariffs and Renewable Heat Incentives are still available when fitting these systems to a completed house rather than including them during the construction process.”



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